Srinivasa Perumal, Tirunangur, Nagapattinam


Basic information about the temple

Moolavar:Srinivasa PerumalAmbal / Thayar:Alarmelmangai, Padmavati
Deity:PerumalHistorical name:TiruVellakulam
Vriksham:Vilvam, ParasuTeertham:Vellakula Teertham
Agamam:

Age (years):

2000-3000

Timing:7 to 12 & 12 to 8Parikaram:

Temple group:Divya Desam
Sung by:

Tirumangaiazhvar

Temple set:

Ekadasa Divya Desam

Navagraham:

Nakshatram:

City / town:TirunangurDistrict:Nagapattinam
Maps from (click): Current location Mayiladuthurai (22.7 km)Nagapattinam (60.2 km)

Tiruvarur (60.5 km)Kumbakonam (60.6 km)

Location

Annan Koil is located a little northwest of Nangur, 8km from Sirkazhi.

Sthala puranam and temple information

It will be useful to read this overview of the Nangur Ekadasa Divya Desam and Ekadasa Rudra Peethams, if you have not already done so, to set the context for the eleven temples (including this temple) in Nangur.

Perumal here is considered the elder brother of Tiruvengadamudayan (Venkatachalapati) at Tirupati, and so the place itself has come to be called Annan Koil. This place is considered equivalent to Tirupati. Those unable to worship at Tirupati can worship here. This is also the only place where both the moolavar and Thayar have the same names as in Tirupati, but here they can be worshipped together, unlike at Tirupati and Tiruchanur.

Vellakulam gets its name from the Sweta Pushkarini. Dundumaran was a king, whose son was called Swetan. It was foretold that when Swetan turned 9, he would die. At the suggestion of Sage Vasishta, Swetan came here and for one full month (from the Shukla Paksha Dasami of Aipasi to the Shukla Paksha Ekadasi of Kartikai) worshipped Perumal here after taking a bath in the temple tank (which is therefore known as Sweta Pushkarini). Perumal appeared and gave him pratyaksham and long life. For this reason, this place is considered a prarthana sthalam for longevity, and as in the case of Tirukadaiyur and other temples, people perform 60th, 70th and 80th birthday celebrations here.

Tiruvellakulam is the birthplace of Kumudavalli Nachiyar, the consort of Tirumangaiazhvar. Sumangali was a celestial who, with her friends, would come to this place to collect flowers. One day, after gathering flowers, her friends went back but Sumangali was left behind. She was brought up by a doctor in this town, and was given the name Kumudavalli. Neelan, a local chieftain, saw her, and wished to marry her. While her father had no objection, Kumudavalli herself asked for two commitments from Neelan – one, that he should get the Pancha Samskaram done as a true Vaishnavite, and two, he should feed 1000 people every day for a year. Over time, Neelan was so involved in this and his devotion was so much, that he later became Tirumangaiazhvar, and eventually married her here. For this reason, this place is considered a prarthana sthalam for marriages, and indeed, marriage functions themselves take place here.

Tirumangaiazhvar, in his pasuram, refers to Perumal here as Annan, which is unique – such an idolation or address is not there for any other temple that azhvar has sung at.

The temple’s vimanam is quite unique – called the Tatvadyotaka Vimanam. It is regarded that this explains the Tavtam or truth, that the Lord is our only recourse.

In the Tamil month of Thai (January-February), the Garuda Sevai utsavam takes place at the nearby Badrinarayana Perumal temple at Nangur, where the Perumal and Garuda of each of the 11 Nangur Divya Desam temples arrive here. This festival is a must visit for those who are interested.

Other information for your visit

There are no accommodation options in Nangur. The nearest place for decent budget and mid-range accommodation is Mayiladuthurai. Lately, some hotels and AirBnB type accommodation has come up around Sirkazhi.

Contact

Madhav Bhattar @ 94898 56554/ 04364 266534

Gallery

Author: TN Temples Project

A personal project to catalogue information on temples (both mainstream and off-the-beaten-track), so that people can learn about them and visit those temples more regularly.

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