Aadi Kesava Perumal, Tiruvattaru, Kanyakumari


Basic information about the temple

Moolavar:Aadi Kesava PerumalAmbal / Thayar:Maragadavalli
Deity:PerumalHistorical name:Tiruvattaru
Vriksham:Teertham:Vattaru, Rama Teertham, sea water
Agamam:

Age (years):

2000-3000

Timing:7 to 12 & 4 to 8Parikaram:

Temple group:Divya Desam
Sung by:

Temple set:

Navagraham:

Nakshatram:

City / town:TiruvattaruDistrict:Kanyakumari
Maps from (click): Current location Nagercoil (32 km)Kanyakumari (51 km)

Tirunelveli (82 km)Thoothukudi (138 km)

Location

Tiruvattaru is located close to Marthandam, and about 30 km from Nagercoil.

Sthala puranam and temple information

During the yagam conducted by Brahma, two demons Kesan and Kesi emerged out of the agni, and started troubling the devas and rishis. Lord Vishnu decimated both of them and used Kesi as his bed. Kesi’s wife was very upset and tried to submerge the Lord with the help of rivers Tambraparani and Ganga. Both the rivers started flowing in full flow towards the resting Lord. On seeing this, Bhudevi made the Lord’s abode slightly higher such that the rivers had to go around the mound like a garland. The derived the name of vattar (circular or curved river) for the village.

Kesi tried to squeeze the Lord with his twelve hands and Vishnu kept a rudraksham in each of his hands. Each of these rudraksh became a Siva temple around the Lord. On the Mahasivaratri, devotees go to each of the Siva temples and finish by praying to Perumal here.

Lord Vishnu here is in sayana kolam with his left hand down and right hand in a blessing posture. There is no lotus flower from his navel, indicating prayers here ensure salvation and mukti.

Perumal’s idol is massive, and one can see the lord only through three doors because of the size. Nammazhvar had done mangalsasanam here.

The temple also has a beautiful Udupi Krishna shrine.

Other information for your visit

Contact

Gallery

Author: TN Temples Project

A personal project to catalogue information on temples (both mainstream and off-the-beaten-track), so that people can learn about them and visit those temples more regularly.

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