Naanmadhia Perumal, Thalachangadu, Nagapattinam


Basic information about the temple

Moolavar:Naanmadhia PerumalAmbal / Thayar:Thalaichanga Nayaki, Senkamalavalli
Deity:PerumalHistorical name:Thalaichanga Nanmathiyam
Vriksham:Teertham:Chandra Pushkarini
Agamam:

Age (years):

500-1000

Timing:6 to 12 & 5 to 8Parikaram:

Temple group:Divya Desam
Sung by:

Tirumangaiazhvar

Temple set:

Navagraham:

Nakshatram:

City / town:ThalachangaduDistrict:Nagapattinam
Maps from (click): Current location Mayiladuthurai (21.9 km)Nagapattinam (51.5 km)

Tiruvarur (53.8 km)Kumbakonam (59.1 km)

Location

Thalachangadu is located 16 km from Sirkazhi and 22 km from Mayiladuthurai.

Sthala puranam and temple information

Typically the crescent moon adorns the head of Lord Siva. At this temple, Vishnu is seen wearing with the crescent on His head!

Sangu poo

According to the Puranas, Chandran is the son of sage Atri and Anusuya, and emerged before Lakshmi during the churning of the ocean (and is therefore considered Her elder brother). He learnt all the arts from his guru, Brhaspati, and also fell in love with Brhaspati’s wife Tara, and soon they had a child – Budhan (Mercury). Learning that the child from Tara’s womb was not his, Brhaspati cursed Chandran to be afflicted with leprosy. Chandran married the 27 daughters of Daksha, under the promise that he would love each one equally, but was particularly fond of Rohini. The other siblings complained, and Daksha made Chandran’s lustre wane every 14 days. Chandran prayed to Vishnu at Srirangam, Indalur and here at Thalachangadu, to have his brightness restored. Pleased with the worship, Vishnu ensured Chandran’s lustre would be renewed periodically, and also wore him on his head.

The place gets its name from the fact that this place used to be a forest of shell- or conch-shaped flowers called Sangu poo in Tamil (Clitoria Ternatea).

Tirumangaiazhvar has done mangalasasanam here.

Other information for your visit

Contact

Phone: 99947 29773

Gallery

Author: TN Temples Project

A personal project to catalogue information on temples (both mainstream and off-the-beaten-track), so that people can learn about them and visit those temples more regularly.

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